What a find! So he found the book in the motorcycle, huh? Fantastic. Love the modernist trees & leaves. Happy new year, Annie! :)
anniebissett:

untitledprojects:

Conrad BakkerUntitled Project: Honda CB77 Superhawk [Walden]oil on carved wood, 2014

Check it, all-sorts! Oil on carved wood.

What a find! So he found the book in the motorcycle, huh? Fantastic. Love the modernist trees & leaves. Happy new year, Annie! :)

anniebissett:

untitledprojects:

Conrad Bakker
Untitled Project: Honda CB77 Superhawk [Walden]
oil on carved wood, 2014

Check it, all-sorts! Oil on carved wood.

Wow, I don’t believe this.

Marina Abramovic’s commencement address to the MFA graduates from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2004. This was before cell phones with cameras captured every moment of our lives. (I did not have a cell phone in 2004!)

I am really amazed that this just surfaced on YouTube a few months ago, and I have the chance to hear her speech again. I had completely forgotten what it was about. I like Sol Lewitt’s advice: Make bad art. (You have to watch, to understand why that is sound advice. Do it!)

Making a family movie. (See the rest here.)

Merci à l’équipe Les Animés! Nous nous sommes bien amusés à nous faire animés!

What I made today…
Text by John Cage
Typeface: Travaille, designed by David Amrock

What I made today…

Text by John Cage

Typeface: Travaille, designed by David Amrock

“Doing and Undergoing is an immersive exhibition offering an interactive experience by featuring site-specific works that reflect the concepts of American philosopher John Dewey, whose idea of experiential learning provides the ground for the works on display. Emerging and established artists from across the globe explore the underlying themes of “Experiential Inquiry” “Experiment and Experience” and “Doing and Undergoing” to disclose rich fields of experience.”
Doing and Undergoing
Teachers College, Columbia University525 West 120th StreetNew York, NY 10027Hours: Daily 10am–8pm
(photo: Jorge Pardo, Untitled, 2013.)

Doing and Undergoing is an immersive exhibition offering an interactive experience by featuring site-specific works that reflect the concepts of American philosopher John Dewey, whose idea of experiential learning provides the ground for the works on display. Emerging and established artists from across the globe explore the underlying themes of “Experiential Inquiry” “Experiment and Experience” and “Doing and Undergoing” to disclose rich fields of experience.”

Doing and Undergoing

Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
Hours: Daily 10am–8pm

(photo: Jorge Pardo, Untitled, 2013.)

A couple of insightful blog posts, bringing a critical perspective to participatory art practice and participatory museum exhibition design.
Art & Participation Culture | Sept 18, 2013
Participating & Compromising | Oct 9, 2013
by Claudia Mesch, Associate Professor at the School of Art, AZ State Universityvia the I.B. Tauris blog 

A couple of insightful blog posts, bringing a critical perspective to participatory art practice and participatory museum exhibition design.

Art & Participation Culture | Sept 18, 2013

Participating & Compromising | Oct 9, 2013

by Claudia Mesch, Associate Professor at the School of Art, AZ State University
via the I.B. Tauris blog 

papress:

Graphic Design Internship
Princeton Architectural Press, East Village, New York City
Details here.

papress:

Graphic Design Internship

Princeton Architectural Press, East Village, New York City

Details here.

Open source book about the open sourcing of design
"Design is undergoing a revolution. Technology is empowering more people to create and disseminate designs, and professionals and enthusiasts are using it to share their work with the world."

Open source book about the open sourcing of design

"Design is undergoing a revolution. Technology is empowering more people to create and disseminate designs, and professionals and enthusiasts are using it to share their work with the world."

Coveting!
verlaine:

Doesn’t look like it’s out yet, but this gem is coming out soon, published by Thames & Hudson

Coveting!

verlaine:

Doesn’t look like it’s out yet, but this gem is coming out soon, published by Thames & Hudson

typographie:

auralenti:

The Imp of the Perverse - Helen Friel

A short story by Edgar Allan Poe, The Imp of the Perverse discusses the voice inside all of us that makes us to do things we know we shouldn’t do. Each page is perforated in a grid system with sections of the text missing. Readers must follow the simple instructions to tear and fold specific sections to reveal the missing text. Books are usually precious objects and the destruction is engineered to give the reader conflicting feelings, do they keep the book in its perfect untorn form? Or give into the imp and enjoy tearing it apart?

typographie:

auralenti:

The Imp of the Perverse - Helen Friel

A short story by Edgar Allan Poe, The Imp of the Perverse discusses the voice inside all of us that makes us to do things we know we shouldn’t do. Each page is perforated in a grid system with sections of the text missing. Readers must follow the simple instructions to tear and fold specific sections to reveal the missing text. Books are usually precious objects and the destruction is engineered to give the reader conflicting feelings, do they keep the book in its perfect untorn form? Or give into the imp and enjoy tearing it apart?

So thrilled to own #151/500 of this book. Emmet Byrne & Michael Aberman designed a delightful “box set” of a catalog.

Emmet Byrne’s recent Alec Soth catalog is also a terrific catalog design (similarly thrilled to own a copy of that one, as well).

Living with an Alec Soth fan pays a lot of dividends in the book design department!

postcardsfromamerica:

Alec Soth gives a tour of the Postcards From America box set. Buy it here: http://postcards.magnumphotos.com/

beingblog:

Beautiful Minds: The Creative Brain Across Time and Cultures

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

World Science Festival with Julie Taymor, Rex Jung, and Douglas FieldsThere’s little doubt, most brain researchers agree, that genius looked much different thousands of years ago. With new tools and improving technologies, scientists are able to see traces of this evolution and observe how our brains are reshaping themselves. But, how are our ideas and commonly held assumptions about intelligence and the creative process being informed by these technologies?

In our most recent show, “Creativity and the Everyday Brain” with neuropsychologist Rex Jung, we featured this video from the World Science Festival. Here, uber-director Julie Taymor (a force of nature and creativity in her own right) and neuroscientists Rex Jung and Douglas Fields wrestle with the notions of genius over time and the possible effects of new technology on attention and creativity. It’s been one of our most popular pieces online, and I hope you’ll add your ideas to the mix.

Book sightings in the “wild”: My book design on Austin Kleon’s Tumblr today! Nice surprise!
Austin’s response to this book reminds me of something Tristan Tzara wrote, in his instructions for how to make a Dada poem. Even though the poem is constructed by chance, Tzara claimed that it still held the stamp of its maker:

"The poem will resemble you. And there you are—an infinitely original author of charming sensibility, even though unappreciated by the vulgar herd."

austinkleon:

Marjorie Perloff, Unoriginal Genius: Poetry by Other Means in the New Century
Here’s a list of “self and ego effacing” tactics Kenneth Goldsmith suggests using to perform the act of “uncreative writing”:

uncreativity, unoriginality, illegibility, appropriation, plagiarism, fraud theft, and falsification

Out of all those, the one that really bothers me is “illegibility.” Goldsmith says his pieces are “unreadable,” that he’s the “most boring writer that has ever lived,” that you don’t really need to read his books “to get the idea of what they’re like,” and that “Readability is the last thing on this poetry’s mind.”
This is the opposite of what I am looking for: I’m looking for writing that is very readable, actually, and not boring. Pleasure is above all what I like to take from reading, and if reading a book provides no pleasure, I go pick up another book.
One of the things that struck me when researching my book Newspaper Blackout poems was how many poets used the erasure or cut-up technique as a way out of their ego. The thing is: I go to poetry for egos. I want to hear what humans have to say, in fact, I want to feel as if I’m talking to a good friend when I’m reading a book. (Or at least an interesting crazy person on the street.)
I want someone to sing to me.
Call me old-fashioned, but this is what I look for.
When I’m making my poems, readability is actually the thing foremost in my mind, and the second is: “what of me can I find in this newspaper article?” (Of course, “me” is whoever I happen to be that day…”
The funny thing about this pose of “uncreative writing,” is that you can’t help but put your mark on something, even if you make something out of the words of others. Perloff hits on this in the 3rd-to-last paragraph of this book:

According to taste: it is important to remember that the citational or appropriative text, however unoriginal its actual words and phrases, is always the product of choice—and hence of individual taste.” 

Next up (if I even need to read it now…): Goldsmith’s Uncreative Writing, which Goldsmith writes in his introduction is actually a cousin to Marcus Boon’s In Praise of Copying — both books “stem from the same ten days,” and began as a collaborative project on sampling between the two.
Filed under: my reading year 2012

Book sightings in the “wild”: My book design on Austin Kleon’s Tumblr today! Nice surprise!

Austin’s response to this book reminds me of something Tristan Tzara wrote, in his instructions for how to make a Dada poem. Even though the poem is constructed by chance, Tzara claimed that it still held the stamp of its maker:

"The poem will resemble you. And there you are—an infinitely original author of charming sensibility, even though unappreciated by the vulgar herd."

austinkleon:

Marjorie Perloff, Unoriginal Genius: Poetry by Other Means in the New Century

Here’s a list of “self and ego effacing” tactics Kenneth Goldsmith suggests using to perform the act of “uncreative writing”:

uncreativity, unoriginality, illegibility, appropriation, plagiarism, fraud theft, and falsification

Out of all those, the one that really bothers me is “illegibility.” Goldsmith says his pieces are “unreadable,” that he’s the “most boring writer that has ever lived,” that you don’t really need to read his books “to get the idea of what they’re like,” and that “Readability is the last thing on this poetry’s mind.”

This is the opposite of what I am looking for: I’m looking for writing that is very readable, actually, and not boring. Pleasure is above all what I like to take from reading, and if reading a book provides no pleasure, I go pick up another book.

One of the things that struck me when researching my book Newspaper Blackout poems was how many poets used the erasure or cut-up technique as a way out of their ego. The thing is: I go to poetry for egos. I want to hear what humans have to say, in fact, I want to feel as if I’m talking to a good friend when I’m reading a book. (Or at least an interesting crazy person on the street.)

I want someone to sing to me.

Call me old-fashioned, but this is what I look for.

When I’m making my poems, readability is actually the thing foremost in my mind, and the second is: “what of me can I find in this newspaper article?” (Of course, “me” is whoever I happen to be that day…”

The funny thing about this pose of “uncreative writing,” is that you can’t help but put your mark on something, even if you make something out of the words of others. Perloff hits on this in the 3rd-to-last paragraph of this book:

According to taste: it is important to remember that the citational or appropriative text, however unoriginal its actual words and phrases, is always the product of choice—and hence of individual taste.” 

Next up (if I even need to read it now…): Goldsmith’s Uncreative Writing, which Goldsmith writes in his introduction is actually a cousin to Marcus Boon’s In Praise of Copying — both books “stem from the same ten days,” and began as a collaborative project on sampling between the two.

Filed under: my reading year 2012

It’s a Fluxus influx! But I couldn’t resist this stationery by George Maciunas.
In some research yesterday, I discovered that this “typeface” is actually his IBM Selectric (he also used it to typeset An Anthology of Chance Operations, 1963).
FLUXUS, ORFLUXATLASFLUXBOOKSFLUXBOXESFLUXCARDSFLUXCHESSFLUXCLOCKFLUXCURESFLUXDANCEFLUXESTRAFLUXFAKESFLUXFESTSFLUXFILMSFLUXGAMESFLUXGROUPFLUXHOUSEFLUNITUREFLUXJOKESFLUX-KITSFLUXMEALSFLUXMUSICFLUXORGANFLUXPAPERFLUXPOEMSFLUX-POSTFLUX-QUIZFLUXSHOPSFLUXTHINGFLUXV-TREFLUXWATERFLUX-WEARFLUX-WORKFLUXMIDST 
Which is your favorite FLUX____?

It’s a Fluxus influx! But I couldn’t resist this stationery by George Maciunas.

In some research yesterday, I discovered that this “typeface” is actually his IBM Selectric (he also used it to typeset An Anthology of Chance Operations, 1963).

FLUXUS, OR
FLUXATLAS
FLUXBOOKS
FLUXBOXES
FLUXCARDS
FLUXCHESS
FLUXCLOCK
FLUXCURES
FLUXDANCE
FLUXESTRA
FLUXFAKES
FLUXFESTS
FLUXFILMS
FLUXGAMES
FLUXGROUP
FLUXHOUSE
FLUNITURE
FLUXJOKES
FLUX-KITS
FLUXMEALS
FLUXMUSIC
FLUXORGAN
FLUXPAPER
FLUXPOEMS
FLUX-POST
FLUX-QUIZ
FLUXSHOPS
FLUXTHING
FLUXV-TRE
FLUXWATER
FLUX-WEAR
FLUX-WORK
FLUXMIDST 

Which is your favorite FLUX____?

Yes, please!
Fluxus Mailing List CardGeorge Maciunasc. 1965
Photograph © Walker Art CenterObject © George Maciunas 

Yes, please!

Fluxus Mailing List Card
George Maciunas
c. 1965

Photograph © Walker Art Center
Object © George Maciunas